C14 carbon dating accuracy

The results can be as much as 150 million years different from each other! They then pick the date they like best, based upon their preconceived notion of how old their theory says the fossil should be .So they start with the assumption that dinosaurs lived millions of years ago, then manipulate the results until they agree with their conclusion. So why is it that if the date doesn't fit the theory, they change the facts?Radiocarbon dating can’t tell the difference between wood that was cut and immediately used for the spear, and wood that was cut years before being re-used for that purpose.

These atoms rapidly decay into radiocarbon-dioxide and along with ordinary CO2 are absorbed by living plants.

As plants enter the human and animal food chains the C14 dioxide enters their living tissue.

The stable C12 and C13, and the unstable or radioactive Carbon 14. Only one C14 atom exists for every one trillion C12 atoms.

Nitrogen atoms in the upper atmosphere are struck by cosmic radiation and create C14 atoms.

By measuring the ratio of carbon-14 to stable carbon-12, scientists can then determine when the organism in question died.

When Libby developed the radiocarbon dating technique, he validated the method by comparing measured carbon ratios (carbon-14/carbon-12) from artifacts of known age with predictions of the ratio expected by assuming the decay rate.However its application has caused extreme confusion and misunderstanding of the archaeological record.Knowing the limitations of this dating method can help avoid colossal archaeological misinterpretations that would otherwise distort history.Carbon dating is reliable within certain parameters but certainly not infallible.When testing an object using radiocarbon dating, several factors have to be considered: First, carbon dating only works on matter that was once alive, and it only determines the approximate date of death for that sample.Radiocarbon or C14 dating employs complex systems of measuring the unstable isotopes in once living matter.