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I had pushed myself to get through my final year at Georgetown.

Justin and I had dated off and on for years, and some part of me always believed we would end up married. I was quiet, studious, painfully shy; he was full of boisterous energy and crude jokes.

Our parents were close friends, and we’d grown up together. I loved his pug nose, his fiery red hair, and his teasing smiles.

Other businesses, like Inmatefone and Phone Donkey, sell forwarding numbers so prisoners can avoid long-distance charges.

She sees herself as a social secretary for people who have been deprived of the forms of communication that are now ubiquitous almost everywhere except for prisons.

But as his school detentions led to expulsions and, eventually, arrests for possession of weed and then burglaries, we fell out of touch.

I was ambitious, and my sights were set on anywhere but Delaware. Maybe when got his act together, I told myself, we could finally have a real relationship.For six years, I worried about who would hold my criminal record against me when I left prison and returned to the dating scene. After wondering who would hold my past against me, now I worried about who would hold it in my favor, this underground cabal of men who text each other links to the news stories of our arrests and convictions with the message “” For the first several months of my freedom, I batted away messages and friend requests from men from Sydney; Bonn, Germany; Kuala Lumpur; Inglewood, Calif.; and towns near me in Connecticut. ’ Blocked his a–.” He had parlayed a connection with one inmate to collect a bevy of released offenders, each of whom he was messaging, trying to meet her, telling her how attractive she was. A woman released two months after I was, asked me later: “Do you know this guy who poked me? We put out a PIP warning — Predators Into Prisoners — our first APB for someone other than ourselves.I knew that my name would be Googled by people and they would know a story about me, before we even met. ” Since I was released from prison three years ago, I have received more than 100 of these types of messages through Facebook. Men all willing to travel to meet me because they Googled my name and were convinced I was the stereotypical released female offender: sex-starved, lonely, lawless. He said he was earning his MBA while working a veterans’ health center. But if he knew my friends from York Correctional Institution, then he already knew that I had been there, too. I finally heard from him the day we were scheduled to meet. One of my old cellmates wrote: “He sent me a friend request, too.” My fellow former prisoners and I found more than 30 recently released women he had messaged on Facebook.These virtual introductions don’t make life easier for me. I assumed that the only guys who would date me would be those with their own records, statistically not an intellectual crowd. I assumed he said this because he was one of the good guys. “I see they have good English grammar classes at Delaware.” “Not even close to my major.” “What was your major? ” as I learned to use social media, having missed out on its boom while in the clink. Will the rest of us ever meet someone who is sincere yet doesn’t care about our records?“Let’s just hope that when you meet someone, he won’t Google your name,” a friend of a friend told me. Meeting someone who has not done time hangs me with a Catch 22: Either I must disclose everything from the start and risk rejection, or conceal the matter, hoping that I can explain it when confronted. You’ve decided to widen your options to include those who are currently incarcerated. Do you want a situation that more easily justifies your desire to go slowly?